Tagged: weight loss Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • midlifelove 11:04 am on December 9, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: choclate, dairy products, , , low protein diet, , weight loss, weight loss myths,   

    Big Fat Lies About Weight Loss 

    Even doctors are confused about the facts on getting fatter.

    A “most read” report in the Sydney Morning Herald by Australian scientists Garry and Sam Egger has separated truth from fiction by surveying doctors and truck drivers on popular myths about weight loss – and they found the doctors were wrong almost as often as the truckies.

    The Top 12 Weight Loss Lies

    1) Fruit juice is about as fattening as beer – TRUE

    Both have about the same kilojoule intake, but alcohol cannot be stored and turned into fat.

    2) Humans need 8 glasses of water a day – FALSE

    The 8 glasses a day rule is “arbitrary and meaningless.” The amount of fluid you need varies according to age, gender, activity level, state of health and the weather – and varies from 3 to 24 glasses a day.

    3) Dairy products can help weight loss – TRUE

    It’s controversial, but recent research suggests eating low-fat dairy is linked to weight loss.

    Dairy ingredients like whey protein, and a combinations of ingredients, like protein and calcium, can increase feelings of fullness, and increase the calories expelled as waste  – both of which may assist weight loss.

    4) Chocolate is healthy provided it is dark – FALSE

    Genuine dark chocolate can have health benefits, but much “dark” chocolate has had the bitter-tasting flavinoids (the good antixodants)  removed and cocoa added, changes which do not have to be noted on the labels. Just because it’s labelled “dark” doesn’t mean it’s good for you.

    5) Exercise is better than dieting for weight loss – FALSE

    While exercise is likely to be important in maintaining weight loss, it’s easier to lose weight by dieting at the start. That’s because reducing intake by 1000 calories a day is the equivalent of walking an extra 15 kilometres daily – unrealistic for most people.

    6) A low-protein diet is best for weight loss – FALSE

    A reasonable intake of protein is likely to be better for weight loss than a low-protein diet, partly because protein gives a feeling of “fullness”.

    The present protein intake of about 13 to 15 per cent of total energy is well below the estimated 25 to 30 per cent often proposed for weight loss and a healthy diet.

    7) Fat people don’t get more hungry than lean people – TRUE

    There is little reason to believe in a difference in genuine hunger – as distinct from psychologically conditioned ”appetite” – between slim and overweight people.

    8) Swimming is better than walking for weight loss – FALSE

    In general, the best exercises for weight loss are those that are weight-bearing, such as walking or jogging. Up to 30 per cent less energy is used in activities such as swimming or cycling, which support weight and can be carried out at a more leisurely pace.

    9) Weight lifting is good for fat loss – TRUE

    Resistance training is often underrated and considered only for the development of strength or size. Weight lifting can be effective for weight loss as well as muscle strengthening.

    10) The best measure of body fat is body mass index -FALSE

    Body mass index (BMI) – a ratio of weight to height – is less accurate in people with a more muscular body type, some ethnic groups such as Pacific Islanders, and the elderly, whose height shrinks with age. Waist circumference and some other body measures provide better estimates.

    11) You lose more weight doing exercise you are good at – FALSE

    Individuals become more efficient and expend less energy as they become experienced with a particular form of exercise. A fit, experienced runner, for example, requires less energy to cover a set distance than an unfit individual of the same weight, age and gender.

    12) An obese person can be fit and healthy – TRUE

    There is accumulating evidence that many obese people are fit and healthy, while a significant proportion of lean individuals suffer from health problems normally associated with obesity. This has led to new questions about the effects of obesity as a marker, rather than a cause, of disease.

     
  • midlifelove 5:52 am on August 24, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: carbohydrate, , , fast food restaurants, low calorie, low carb diet, maintaining weight loss, National Weight Control Registry, NWCR, regular physical activity, successful slimmer, weight loss,   

    Exercise Won’t Make You Thin – Successful Losers 

    sucess loserYou’ve lost weight – more than once – but you always put it back on again. Experts agree that maintaining loss is the even harder than losing it in the first place. And according to people who should know – a group who lost big amounts and successfully remained slimmed down – regular physical activity is an important part of their success.

    Secrets of the Successfully Slim

    The National Weight Control Registry  – which maintains a registry of 5000 people, average age 45, who have lost big amounts of weight and kept it off for more than a year – looked at the lifestyle secrets of these people, with weight loss of 30 kg for an average of 5.5 years.*

    Nine of ten of those who were successful modified both diet and exercise to lose weight and keep it off.

    Successful strategies included:

    • eating a diet low in fat
    • frequent self-monitoring of body weight and food intake
    • high levels of regular physical activity

    Low Calorie, Not Low Carb Best

    Specifically, these successful slim people (80% of them women) followed these guidelines:

    • low calorie diet of on 1381 kcal/day on average
    • 24% fat, 19% protein, and 56% carbohydrate calories
    • < 1% of participants consumed a low carbohydrate diet
    • the few who did eat < 24% carbohydrate calorie diets maintained their weight for less time and were less physically active
    • consumed  5 meals per day, ate at fast food restaurants only 1x week, and 2.5 meals per week at other restaurants
    • 3 in 4 participants weighed themselves either daily or weekly
    • most participants monitored their dietary intake regularly, particularly if they noted more than a couple lbs of weight gain
    • 91% of the registrants used exercise to assist them with weight maintenance
    • women averaged 2545 kcals/wk and men 3293 kcals/wk in physical activity; this is equivalent to walking 20-30 miles per week
    • most increased both lifestyle activity and regular structured exercise
    • 77% of registrants used walking as their main form of exercise
    • 1 in 5 engaged in weight training
    • among those who regained weight, they increased fat intake, decreased physical activity by an average of 800 kcals/wk, and reduced the amount of self-monitoring activities

    The Registry study offers hope for those who stick with it. It found the longer you do it, the easier it gets.  “Once these successful maintainers have maintained a weight loss for 2–5 years, the chances of longer-term success greatly increase,” the NWCR study says.

     
    • Поликсена Вышеславовна 10:04 pm on November 11, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Вечер добрый. Вот меня, как консультанта из Белорусии, беспокоит вопрос о отношении к нам, так сказать к тем, кто только начинает свою карьеру… Поговаривают, что в других странах накануне праздников, консультантов поздравляют, дарят что-то ценное, а не обходятся банальной открыткой, как это делается у нас… Ведь это же несомненно и приятно и понимаешь, что тебя хотя бы немного, но уважают. Расскажите, как у Вас с этим?

  • midlifelove 5:44 am on August 21, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: aerobics, cardio, , eat more, , fatter, hungrier, John Cloud, obese, overcompensate, resistance, reward, , thin, Time magazine, weight loss   

    Exercise Won’t Make You Thin? Yeah Right. 

    exercise won't make you thinTime magazine and writer John Cloud bought themselves a fight with the Aug 9 cover story Exercise Won’t Make You Thin. Howls from medical professionals, personal trainers, and their nemesis – the people who moan they “exercised for four hours a week and never lost a pound” – are still ringing.

    Time argued:

    • Exercising just makes us hungrier, which means we eat more, AND
    • Because we’ve exercised we “reward” ourselves with the chocolate pastry or muffin we would not have otherwise had, immediately undoing the calorie loss we’ve earned with our workout session (women are apparently the worst “overcompensators”.)
    • We’re being “tricked” into unpleasant and useless exercise and while we are just getting hungrier and fatter. (Look at national obesity figures.)

    The resulting pros-and-cons discussion has thrown up some great research clarifying whether exercise gets you thin, keeps you thin or both.

    The short conclusion is it depends on what sort of exercise (aerobic, weights etc) you are doing. And while it may not help you lose weight,  it certainly will help you stay that way.

    Diet to Lose, Exercise to Maintain

     

    Two studies in particular show clearly that while diet may play a bigger part than exercise in losing weight, exercise plays an essential part in maintaining that loss.

    One 12 week study by Kramer, Volek et al,* which included aerobic, strength training, and diet controls, showed fat mass losses from the three approaches as follows:

    • Diet only: 6.7kg,
    • Diet/aerobics/cardio: 7kg,
    • Diet/aerobics plus weights/resistance: 10kg.
      wexercise_0817 copy

     

    Most noteworthy – the group that combined diet, cardio and resistance training lost almost no lean tissue whereas the diet only group lost almost 3kg worth of lean tissue.

    Training was 3 times a week starting at 30 mins and progressing to 3 x 50 minutes over the 12 weeks. So the weight training group lost 3.3 kg, (21.1lbs,) – 44% and 35% more than diet and aerobic only groups respectively –  in the same time frame.

    We’ll deal with study number two – which examined the lifestyles of people who had taken off large amounts of weight and then successfully kept it off – in Instalment 2 of Exercise Won’t Make You Thin Successful Losers.

    *Kramer, Volek et al., Influence of exercise training on physiological and performance changes with weight loss in men. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 31, No. 9, 1999.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel