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  • midlifelove 3:52 am on February 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: cancer, Coffee good for you, Coffee health benefits, Harvard Medical School, , longevity, , type 2 diabetes   

    Coffee Brims With Health 

    Drink up, coffee lovers. Not only is coffee aromatic and delicious, it’s good for you.

    Who says? None other than Harvard Medical School.

    Once considered questionable for your health, it turns out that the beloved beverage is actually healthful in moderation. That means a few cups a day.

    At about 20 cents per 6-ounce cup, coffee is a good deal if you brew it yourself.

    Harvard researchers say drinking coffee may help prevent diseases such as:

    • Cancer: Some studies have found coffee drinkers have lower rates of colon and rectal cancers, better survival rates with prostate cancer, and are 50 percent less likely to get liver cancer than coffee abstainers.
    • Type 2 diabetes: Coffee is thought to contain chemicals that lower blood sugar because heavy coffee drinkers may be half as likely to get diabetes as those who drink little or no coffee. Coffee also may increase your resting metabolism rate, which could help prevent diabetes.
    • Parkinson’s disease: Coffee seems to help protect men from Parkinson’s disease, but not women. The difference might be due to estrogen, researchers say.
    • Heart disease: Coffee is not linked to the development of heart disease. In the past few years, Harvard scientists say, coffee has been shown to be safe even for heart attack survivors. Scientists think antioxidants in coffee may reduce inflammation and protect blood vessel walls.
    • Life span: Recent studies suggest that drinking coffee decreases the risk of premature death, especially in women. Women who drank at least five to seven cups a week had a death rate 26 percent lower than non-consumers, a large investigation by researchers in Spain and at Harvard Medical School found.

    Three Or More Cups Good

    It’s not only Harvard researchers who are touting the brew’s benefits. As the Palm Beach Post reported, in September a study led by Neal Freedman of the National Cancer Institute showed that people with chronic hepatitis C and advanced liver disease who drank three or more cups of coffee a day cut their risk of the disease progressing by 53 percent.

    Although caffeine might be considered the “active ingredient” in coffee, coffee is only 2 percent caffeine and 98 percent “other stuff,” including more than 1,000 different compounds such as vitamins, minerals and amino acids.

    It even contains fiber. Each cup contains from 1.1 to 1.8 grams of soluble dietary fiber, the kind that dissolves in water and helps prevent cholesterol from being absorbed by the intestines, according to researchers at the Spanish National Research Council in Madrid.

    But Not If You Are Pregnant

    Do researchers have any words of caution? Yes — although regular coffee drinking isn’t harmful for most people, that might not hold true for pregnant women. Research has linked miscarriage to caffeine consumption of 200 milligrams or more per day. A typical cup of coffee has 100 to 150 milligrams, Harvard reports.

     
  • midlifelove 11:37 pm on February 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , blood supply to penis, cardiovascular disease, , , , , , medication, , sexual desire, supplements, testoterone, treatment, type 2 diabetes,   

    Is testosterone supplementation effective for ED? 

    The short answer is yes – in some, but not all – cases where testosterone levels are low.

    Approximately 10 to 15 percent of men with erectile dysfunction suffer from low testosterone levels. Yet up to a quarter of all men are estimated to have low testosterone levels, with that number rising as men age – and it’s not clear why some, but not all, experience ED as a consequence.

    What is clear is that when low testosterone is the cause of ED, 40 to 60 percent of men benefit from testosterone supplementation. When other factors – poor blood supply to penis, stress, etc – are involved – testosterone treatment alone is not nearly as effective in curing erectile dysfunction, even though it may increase sexual desire.

    Now it’s become clear that testosterone supplements can give a big boost to men who don’t respond to impotence drugs like Viagra, Levitra and Cialis. It is estimated a significant proportion of men – between 25 and 50 per cent – do not respond to the medications which have become known as PDE5 inhibitors.

    When testosterone is added to the therapy up to 70 per cent of men with low testosterone find the cure for erectile dysfunction, as well as improving their orgasms and overall quality of life.

    The same strong result was found in men with low testosterone using long acting testosterone therapy alone, who received testosterone injections at six weeks and then three monthly intervals.

    After twelve and 30 weeks of testosterone treatment, 20 out of the 29 patients demonstrated marked improvement in erectile function, without using any other medication.

    As a result, men’s health organisations are reporting a change in the attitude to the use of testosterone supplements – which recent studies have found can be helpful in treating conditions linked with male ageing like tiredness, depression, and lack of libido.

    Recent studies have also suggested that the effects of an age-related lack of testosterone may go beyond feeling a bit tired, with type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease appearing to be linked with it.

    Another reason for updating the guidelines on who to screen for testosterone deficiency and how to treat it lies in the results of some studies that suggest that some of the fears about testosterone supplements increasing the risk of prostate cancer may have been unfounded.

    The new guidelines recommend measuring testosterone in all men who have both type 2 diabetes and symptoms of testosterone deficiency, and in those with erectile dysfunction or low libido.

    “This is a major change. That puts a lot of people in the category of being screened for low testosterone,” says Andre Araujo, director of epidemiology at the New England Research Institutes in Watertown, Massachusetts.

     
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