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  • midlifelove 3:08 am on July 19, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: andrology, anecdotal, better mood, , china, diabetic, , , , gmp, heart rate, less fatigue, medicine, metabolism, nitric oxide, oxygen, penile, , stimulate nerve ending   

    Caffeine and Your Sex Life 

    love coffeeWe drink around 4.4kgs each of it a year – that’s around 3 cups a day – and at those levels your mid morning coffee break is probably good for your health.

    It stimulates the nerve endings so gives a better mood, less fatigue, clearer thinking and better attention. Your metabolism speeds up, heart rate increases, bringing more oxygen to the muscles and generating more energy.

    But what about your sex life? There’s a confusing range of opinion about the impact caffeine has on sexual performance, from anecdotal forum comment from men saying they notice a distinct improvement when they drink less coffee, to recent research indicating  that for diabetic men in particular, a daily cup of coffee or two can improve sex by making diabetic medicines work more effectively.

    The secret it seems is in the level of consumption – below five cups a day it can be beneficial. Down five or more cups a day and you’ll be in danger of putting your sex life into reverse.

    Coffee for Diabetic Men’s Sex Lives

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) impacts between 35 to 75% of all male diabetic patients, three times the amount reported in non-diabetic males.

    While medications have been developed for ED, diabetic ED remains difficult to treat and no single treatment has proven effective for all diabetic men with ED.

    But a new joint Chinese-American study showing caffeine reversed ED in diabetic rats is giving new hope for a better love life for diabetic men.

    How Coffee Helped Improve Sex

    Erections are created by blood flow to the penis, and are dependent on what scientists refer to as the “NOcGMP pathway” (the Nitric Oxide pathway). In diabetic men, relaxation of penile arteries – allowing blood flow – is severely constricted.

    ED has most often been treated with medicines that act as inhibitors to prevent constriction, and because caffeine is a non-selective inhibitor, scientists in this study hypothesized that caffeine could help elevate cGMP and reduce constriction.

    Diabetic rats given caffeine for 8 weeks enjoy partially restored erectile function, and scientists predict a combination of caffeine and medication offers future treatment hopes.

    As a result of the study, the scientists gave a big tick to moderate coffee consumption – but warned that high levels (500mg – or more than five cups a day) could have negative effects such as impaired sleep and increased anxiety, both well-known factors in ED.

    Herbs for Sexual Performance

    Coffee is not the only natural stimulant which effects constriction and relaxation of blood supply to the penis. The so-called PDE-5 inhibitors – found in herbs like horny goat weed – operate in a similar way. Some herbal treatments for erectile dysfunction like Herbal Ignite contain horny goat weed as part of their formula. Etc etc – Sam can you improve this a bit?

    “Effect of Caffeine on Erectile Function Via Up-Regulating Cavernous cGMP in Diabetic Rats” appeared in the April 17, 2008 edition of the Journal of Andrology, published by the Department of Urology, Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University, School of Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China ,and the University of Texas Medical School’s Department of Urology and MD. Anderson Cancer Center, both in Houston. Contributors included Run Wang, MD, FACS and Yutian Dai, MD, PhD with Rong Yang, Jiuling Wang, Yun Chen, and Zeyu, Sun.

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  • midlifelove 5:22 am on June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: albert eintein, , chemical, , , endeavours, , linked, love wins, lucy brown, medicine, move, mri, prairie voles, pursuit, , , , ,   

    Is Love More Powerful than Sex? 

    Sex and romance may seem inextricably linked, but the human brain clearly distinguishes between the two, according to a new study. The upshot: Love is the more powerful emotion.

    The results of brain scans speak to longstanding questions of whether the pursuit of love and sex are different emotional endeavours or whether romance is just warmed over sexual arousal.

    “Our findings show that the brain areas activated when someone looks at a photo of their beloved only partially overlap with the brain regions associated with sexual arousal,” said Arthur Aron of the State University of New York-Stony Brook. “Sex and romantic love involve quite different brain systems.”

    Left side, right side

    The study was small, however, involving 17 young men and women, all of whom had recently fallen madly in love. They filled out questionnaires while their brains were hooked up to a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) system.

    Romance seems to steep in parts of the brain that are rich in dopamine, a chemical known to affect emotions. These brain regions are also linked by other studies to the motivation for rewards.

    “To our surprise, the activation regions associated with intense romantic love were mostly on the right side of the brain, while the activation regions associated with facial attractiveness were mostly on the left,” said Lucy Brown of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

    The study also revealed that as a romance matures, so does the mind.

    “We found several brain areas where the strength of neural activity changed with the length of the romance,” Brown said. “Everyone knows that relationships are dynamic over time, but we are beginning to track what happens in the brain as a love relationship matures.”

    sex

    Love wins

    The processing of romantic feelings involves a “constellation of neural systems.” The researchers — neuroscientists, anthropologists and social psychologists — declare love the clear winner versus sex in terms of its power over the human mind.

    “Romantic love is one of the most powerful of all human experiences,” said study member Helen Fisher, an anthropologist at Rutgers University. “It is definitely more powerful than the sex drive.”

    Animals, too

    There are hints in the study that romance is not a uniquely human trait.

    Some of the changes seen with mature romances were in regions of the brain also associated with pair-bonding in prairie voles. Other studies have found that expressions of attraction in a female prairie vole are linked to a 50 percent hike in dopamine activity in the brain region that corresponds to the location where human romance is processed.

     
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