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  • midlifelove 9:42 am on October 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Arnold Palmer, Colin Powell, ed, , Harry Belafonte, , , Nelson Mandela, nerve-sparing surgery, , prostate cancer treatments, , risks of prostate cancer treatment options, Robert de Niro, , surgery,   

    Prostate Cancer and Impotence 

    Prostate Cancer1It could be one of those random quiz items – what do Robert de Niro, Rudy Guiliani, Nelson Mandela, Arnold Palmer, Harry Belafonte and Colin Powell have in common?

    The answer is that all of them have had prostate cancer, been treated in a variety of ways, (from surgery to radiation to hormone therapy), survived to tell the tale and with a couple of exceptions (mainly de Niro) have been willing to talk publicly to encourage other men to get tested.

    In Rudy Guiliani’s case that openness included acknowledging the issue that is still only reluctantly discussed by many men when facing up to prostate cancer – impotence as a possible side effect of treatment.

    During divorce proceedings in 2001 Mr Guiliani said he had been impotent for a year as a result of his prostate cancer treatments (hormone therapy followed with radiation in implanted pellet form and 25 external radiation treatments).

    Outcome Can’t Be Predicted

    Temporary or permanent impotence can affect up to 70 per cent of men with prostate cancer, and doctors says as of now there is no way to determine who will be affected or for how long after treatment. Even in the best conditions, 10 per cent of patients may be impotent afterwards.

    Andrew Penman, chief executive of the Cancer Council of NSW, (Australia) says doctors who suggest testing younger men PSA levels to identify possible cancers must also tell them at the first interview about ”flow-on issues.”

    It very much depends on a range of factors including the size and aggressiveness of the tumor, the patient’s age, lifestyle, and overall health, and the treatment option chosen.

    Treatment Options & Risks

    • Hormonal therapy – Testosterone is either reduced or its uptake blocked. Erectile dysfunction and a loss of desire usually occur after two to four weeks of treatment.
    • Surgery – The prostate and surrounding cancerous tissue are removed. If nerve-sparing surgery is used, erectile function can return within the first year. Recovery of erectile function after a non-nerve-sparing surgery is unlikely, but possible.
    • Radiation – The tumour area may be blasted with external beam radiation, more tightly targeted for proton radiation, or implanted with radioactive pellets for continuing therapy. ED is the most common complication and usually occurs six months after treatment.
    • Observation – Often called “watchful waiting,” this strategy may be appropriate in some cases where disease progression is slow.

    How Effective Are Oral Erectile Dysfunction Drugs?

    • Following surgery Web MD reports that as many as 60 to 70 per cent of men who have had nerves spared on both sides of the prostate will regain erections. Results are less favourable for men who have had a single nerve spared or no nerves spared.
    • Following radiation therapy Overall, 50 to 60 per cent of men regain erections with Viagra following radiation for prostate cancer. However, current data are rather limited, especially for patients treated with radioactive seed implants.
    • Hormone therapy Specialists at the Cleveland Clinic find that men treated with hormone therapy do not respond well to any erectile dysfunction treatments, including Viagra, but data are limited.

    Can I Use Herbal Supplements?

    There is continuing research into natural ingredients that may be of benefit for prostate health, including saw palmetto and the tomato-based active substance lycopene. Tribulus terrestris in herbal supplements like Herbal Ignite is NOT recommended without doctor’s approval because it stimulates testosterone levels which may be counter-productive to treatment.

    Prostate cancer survivor Jim Tucker’s Prostablog contains a comprehensive section on natural ingredients and therapies which is regularly updated.

     
  • midlifelove 3:08 am on July 19, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: andrology, anecdotal, better mood, , china, diabetic, ed, , , gmp, heart rate, less fatigue, , metabolism, nitric oxide, oxygen, penile, , stimulate nerve ending   

    Caffeine and Your Sex Life 

    love coffeeWe drink around 4.4kgs each of it a year – that’s around 3 cups a day – and at those levels your mid morning coffee break is probably good for your health.

    It stimulates the nerve endings so gives a better mood, less fatigue, clearer thinking and better attention. Your metabolism speeds up, heart rate increases, bringing more oxygen to the muscles and generating more energy.

    But what about your sex life? There’s a confusing range of opinion about the impact caffeine has on sexual performance, from anecdotal forum comment from men saying they notice a distinct improvement when they drink less coffee, to recent research indicating  that for diabetic men in particular, a daily cup of coffee or two can improve sex by making diabetic medicines work more effectively.

    The secret it seems is in the level of consumption – below five cups a day it can be beneficial. Down five or more cups a day and you’ll be in danger of putting your sex life into reverse.

    Coffee for Diabetic Men’s Sex Lives

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) impacts between 35 to 75% of all male diabetic patients, three times the amount reported in non-diabetic males.

    While medications have been developed for ED, diabetic ED remains difficult to treat and no single treatment has proven effective for all diabetic men with ED.

    But a new joint Chinese-American study showing caffeine reversed ED in diabetic rats is giving new hope for a better love life for diabetic men.

    How Coffee Helped Improve Sex

    Erections are created by blood flow to the penis, and are dependent on what scientists refer to as the “NOcGMP pathway” (the Nitric Oxide pathway). In diabetic men, relaxation of penile arteries – allowing blood flow – is severely constricted.

    ED has most often been treated with medicines that act as inhibitors to prevent constriction, and because caffeine is a non-selective inhibitor, scientists in this study hypothesized that caffeine could help elevate cGMP and reduce constriction.

    Diabetic rats given caffeine for 8 weeks enjoy partially restored erectile function, and scientists predict a combination of caffeine and medication offers future treatment hopes.

    As a result of the study, the scientists gave a big tick to moderate coffee consumption – but warned that high levels (500mg – or more than five cups a day) could have negative effects such as impaired sleep and increased anxiety, both well-known factors in ED.

    Herbs for Sexual Performance

    Coffee is not the only natural stimulant which effects constriction and relaxation of blood supply to the penis. The so-called PDE-5 inhibitors – found in herbs like horny goat weed – operate in a similar way. Some herbal treatments for erectile dysfunction like Herbal Ignite contain horny goat weed as part of their formula. Etc etc – Sam can you improve this a bit?

    “Effect of Caffeine on Erectile Function Via Up-Regulating Cavernous cGMP in Diabetic Rats” appeared in the April 17, 2008 edition of the Journal of Andrology, published by the Department of Urology, Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University, School of Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China ,and the University of Texas Medical School’s Department of Urology and MD. Anderson Cancer Center, both in Houston. Contributors included Run Wang, MD, FACS and Yutian Dai, MD, PhD with Rong Yang, Jiuling Wang, Yun Chen, and Zeyu, Sun.

     
  • midlifelove 4:33 am on May 6, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , dietary supplements, doctor, ed, , FDA, green viagra, , , icarin, , , PDE-5, , regulatory, sex tonic, spiked pills, ,   

    Bizarre law turns Coffee, Chocolate into prescription drugs 

    It could be a case of “Doctor Doctor, I need my morning coffee script renewed,” if a bizarre move to ban spiked herbal sex pills is approved. That’s because coffee, as well as chocolate, pomegranate juice and a host of other ‘normal and safe’ foods and herbs contain the active ingredients similar to those in ED drugs Viagra, Cialis and Levitra.

    waitress2And in a bid to control “Green Viagra” – sex pills adulterated with ED drugs – New Zealand authorities are gunning for any substance containing PDE-5 inhibitors, the thing that makes ED drugs work.

    In a move that natural health advocates suspect is directly from mega pharma interests keen to squash competition, popular men’s sex herbs horny goat weed and guarana could also be made prescription only medicines.

    Many people prefer herbal alternatives because they are more relaxed and natural to use, and don’t produce a feeling of “compulsion” on female partners to comply so the man “get’s his money’s worth”.

    Popular herbal sex tonic Herbal Ignite is one supplement likely to be affected by the change, because it contains horny goat weed, with the active ingredient icarin, a PDE-5 inhibitor.

    If the regulators carry through with their proposal, New Zealand will be the only country in the world that makes horny goat weed into a prescription medicine – they obviously think it works!

    The muddle has occurred because health authorities understandably want to control sales of “spiked” sex pills, many of them produced in Asia, adulterated with active ingredients (the so-called PDE-5 inhibitors) from ED medicines Viagra, Cialis and Levitra.

    But in their enthusiasm to curb sale of the adulterated pills, NZ health regulators are recommending that any substance containing a PDE-5 inhibitor be made a prescription medicine.

    The problem is PDE-5 inhibitors are found in smaller or greater amounts in many foods and herbs, and the recommendation suggests a blanket ban without any reference to risk levels or the strength of the active ingredient.

    Herbal Ignite managing director Tim Bickerstaff said his company was fully behind the moves to outlaw “spiked” sex pills because they gave all herbal enhancement products a bad name.

    “These ‘spiked’ pills claim to be totally natural and yet they contain undeclared amounts of drugs,” he says.

    “That could be dangerous. It highlights the importance for the public to find a product they can trust,” said Tim Bickerstaff, who launched his men’s sex tonic Ignite ten years ago.

    However Tim Bickerstaff says he believes the NZ authorities already have the power to deal with the problem, just as the FDA did in the USA, without outlawing a safe and effective herb.

    “If they find “spiked” herbal products in their testing they can prosecute them under several different laws, including the Medicines Act, Medicines Regulations and the Dietary Supplements Regulations. They don’t need to introduce more red tape – and give the pharmaceutical companies a free run.”

     
    • SALLY TAS 5:04 am on May 6, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      I am surprised to read this, knew nothing about it. It certainly sounds like something the mega pharma interests would be behind. They are always after any nutritional supplements.

  • midlifelove 11:37 pm on February 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , blood supply to penis, cardiovascular disease, , ed, , , , medication, , sexual desire, supplements, testoterone, treatment, ,   

    Is testosterone supplementation effective for ED? 

    The short answer is yes – in some, but not all – cases where testosterone levels are low.

    Approximately 10 to 15 percent of men with erectile dysfunction suffer from low testosterone levels. Yet up to a quarter of all men are estimated to have low testosterone levels, with that number rising as men age – and it’s not clear why some, but not all, experience ED as a consequence.

    What is clear is that when low testosterone is the cause of ED, 40 to 60 percent of men benefit from testosterone supplementation. When other factors – poor blood supply to penis, stress, etc – are involved – testosterone treatment alone is not nearly as effective in curing erectile dysfunction, even though it may increase sexual desire.

    Now it’s become clear that testosterone supplements can give a big boost to men who don’t respond to impotence drugs like Viagra, Levitra and Cialis. It is estimated a significant proportion of men – between 25 and 50 per cent – do not respond to the medications which have become known as PDE5 inhibitors.

    When testosterone is added to the therapy up to 70 per cent of men with low testosterone find the cure for erectile dysfunction, as well as improving their orgasms and overall quality of life.

    The same strong result was found in men with low testosterone using long acting testosterone therapy alone, who received testosterone injections at six weeks and then three monthly intervals.

    After twelve and 30 weeks of testosterone treatment, 20 out of the 29 patients demonstrated marked improvement in erectile function, without using any other medication.

    As a result, men’s health organisations are reporting a change in the attitude to the use of testosterone supplements – which recent studies have found can be helpful in treating conditions linked with male ageing like tiredness, depression, and lack of libido.

    Recent studies have also suggested that the effects of an age-related lack of testosterone may go beyond feeling a bit tired, with type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease appearing to be linked with it.

    Another reason for updating the guidelines on who to screen for testosterone deficiency and how to treat it lies in the results of some studies that suggest that some of the fears about testosterone supplements increasing the risk of prostate cancer may have been unfounded.

    The new guidelines recommend measuring testosterone in all men who have both type 2 diabetes and symptoms of testosterone deficiency, and in those with erectile dysfunction or low libido.

    “This is a major change. That puts a lot of people in the category of being screened for low testosterone,” says Andre Araujo, director of epidemiology at the New England Research Institutes in Watertown, Massachusetts.

     
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