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  • midlifelove 4:30 am on March 6, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ballina, Bass Coast, , Bribie Island, Copper Coast, Echuca, Geraldton, Inverloch, Kadina, Mandurah, Moonta, Murray River, New South Wales, Perth, Phillip Island, Port Macquarie, Queensland, South Australia, St Helens, Tamar Valley, Tasmania, Toowoomba, Torquay, Tweed Valley, Victor Harbor, , Wallaroo, Western Australia, Wonthaggi   

    Best Places To Retire in Australia 

    You’re thinking of escaping from the big city for a more peaceful, less polluted life in a country town or beachside community. You want to avoid the known – and unknown hazards – like man-eating koalas and deranged gunmen. So before you sell up and move, it’s a great idea to do investigate your options. And there’s no better guide on how to avoid disaster than Jill and Owens Weeks’s well-researched retirement advice.

    For more than a decade, they’ve investigated Australia from north to south, east to west, for their best-selling publications.

    Here’s their pick of the best places to retire.

    New South Wales

    The state with “by far the greatest number of ideal retirement locations.  North of Sydney, the entire coastline all the way up to Newcastle is popular, particularly as retirement trends change in favour of semi retirement.”

    Port Macquarie – “vibrant and dynamic area which offers many of the services and culture of a large city.”

    Ballina “good for those who want to get away from capital cities and can live without many of the facilities they offer.”

    Tweed Valley “offers most of the good features of the Gold Coast without many of the downsides . .  and close to Coolangatta international airport just across the border in Queensland.”

    Victoria

    Torquay (near Geelong) “There’s a buzz about the place . . . close to Geelong’s facilities. Fastest growing non-metropolitan area in Victoria and a clear favourite with retirees.”

    Bass Coast (Inverloch, Wonthaggi, Phillip Island) or Echuca (on the Murray River) “Cost of housing reasonable and a compelling list of positive features with few if any down sides.”

    Western Australia

    Mandurah (south of Perth)  – “Special appeal because of the number of services focused on retirees,” or Geraldton.

    Queensland

    Toowoomba “affordable housing, good facilities, relaxed pace, and not over-crowded with tourists in holidays. Not as humid as the coast, and Brisbane is accessible.”

    Bribie Island “preferred destination for those who want to get away from the congestion of the Gold coast.”

    South Australia

    Victor Harbor “Outstanding geography, access to Adelaide, vineyards and fine food. Holiday destination for over 100 years, town is full of well-preserved buildings, museums,” or the Copper Coast Yorke Peninsula  (Kadina, Wallaroo, Moonta.)

    Tasmania

    St Helens “Ideal climate on the Sun Coast, an affordable and relaxed lifestyle that few places in Australia can match,” or the Tamar Valley

    Checklist for Retiring

    Jill and Owen Weeks suggest:

    • Consider renting in the location of your choice. House-sit or even caravan-sit before you buy.
    • Subscribe to the local newspaper for at least 12 months before you move. This provides a good source of jobs, real estate and what’s happening in the community.
    • Research the utilities and services. Does the mobile phone work? Is there internet connection and educational services? This is particularly important if you are running a home-based business. Also check local services such as the nearest mechanic or electrician.
    • Will your new home require major renovations? Is it ‘older body friendly?’ Will you eventually need to move because of stairs? What happens if your mobility is impaired?

    See also Where to Retire in Australia for additional advice.

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  • midlifelove 11:02 pm on March 4, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 70th birthday, All-Starr summer tour, Barbara Bach, George Harrison, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Ringo turns 70, The Beatles, vegetarian, YNot 15th album   

    Ringo: Great Form Facing 70 

    With a new album, an enduring and happy marriage, and a zest for life that’s the envy of many 30-year-olds, Ringo Starr enters his 70th year with high spirits.

    He’s the eldest of the famous Beatles – he will hit his 70-year milestone on July 7  – and he’s got the newest music.

    He’s not missing a beat as he embarks on a three-week promotional tour for his just-released Y Not album, his 15th solo outing on which fellow Beatle Paul McCartney plays bass on the song ‘Peace Dream’.

    And he plans to mark his 70th by flashing a two-fingered peace sign at noon and playing an evening gig at Radio City Music Hall as part of a summer tour with his latest All-Starr band.

    Last year on the Larry King Show, Starr noted: “I work out. I have a trainer. And I watch what I eat. That’s it really. And I’m in love with a beautiful girl, so it keeps me young.”

    Turning 40 was Harder

    And as he told Randy Lewis of the Los Angeles Times, 70 is “not as big as 40 was. Forty was: ’Oh, God, 40!

    “There’s that damn song, ‘Life Begins at 40.’ No, it’s not so big anymore. I am nearly 70, and I’d love to be nearly 40, but that’s never going to happen.

    “I feel the older I get, the more I’m learning to handle life,”

    Notes Lewis: “His charming Liverpudlian accent is nearly as strong as ever, even though he’s maintained a home in Los Angeles for the last 34 years — the majority of it with actress Barbara Bach, whom he married in 1981 — along with residences in England and Monte Carlo.”

    God Now ‘My Life’

    He’s trim – like McCartney and his late pal Harrison, he’s an avowed vegetarian – looks 15 years younger than his age, and as the years roll by spiritual issues have become more prominent, he says.

    “Being on this quest for a long time, it’s all about finding yourself,” Starr says. “For me, God is in my life. I don’t hide from that. … I think the search has been on since the ’60s. … I stepped off the path there for many years and found my way (back) onto it, thank God.”

    There’s no secret to his successful marriage to Barbara, Starr told USA Today.  “I’m just blessed that she puts up with me. I love the woman. She loves me. There’s less down days than up, and we get on really well. We do spend a lot of time together. That’s the deal.”

    Many Artistic Projects

    Starr says he also needs diverse creative outlets to keep him engaged when he’s not making albums or touring with his All-Starr band. In the 1970s it was acting, now it’s art — a selection of his photos appears inside the album.

    “I am always painting,” he says. “I love photography. It’s easy to take shots. But if you have to choose, it’s music. I love music, I love playing.”

    Ringo was three months older than John Lennon, who would have turned 70 this year. Lennon was 40 when he was shot dead in New York City.

    Paul McCartney will be 68 this year. George Harrison would have been 67.

     
  • midlifelove 4:24 am on March 1, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Baby boomers, , Bette Davis, Jill and Owen Weeks, London Marathon, retire, Richard Branson   

    Where To Retire In Australia 

    You might sympathise with Hollywood star Bette Davis when she said “I will not retire while I’ve still got my legs and my make-up box.”

    Many Baby Boomers see age as “just a number” and like Virgin boss Richard Branson (64) – who’s added training for the 2010 London Marathon to his punishing work schedule  – they’re busy packing more life into their years.

    But even for those to whom “retirement” is a foreign concept, changing lifestyle, moving home, or splitting their year between two places, can be tempting as a mid-life option.

    Looking For A Change

    The children are independent, you don’t need to worry about climbing the corporate ladder any more, and you can take time out to think about what you want to do with the rest of your life.

    If you‘re living in Australia or thinking of moving there, Jill and Owen Weeks have done a heap of research to help with your decisions.

    Their book Where to Retire in Australia is a great resource for anyone in “the Moving Generation” looking for a change of lifestyle.

    • The Weeks’ golden rule is: the most successful moves are usually  less than 200km or no more than two hours from the old location. Why? So people remain in easy reach of old friends, family and social networks.

    Key Issues To Consider

    They’ve identified the key issues to decide on when making a change:

    • Taking care of yourself; Consider closeness to doctors, hospitals and specialist medicine if required; social life – how easy is for family and friends to visit, will you find  your others who share your interests, do you want to spend part of your year in another location?
    • Weather; Check out the climate before you buy. If you’ve only holidayed at the location at certain times of the year rent for 18 months before making a permanent move while you decide if the climate is for you.
    • Keeping the Body Moving; Ensure you can pursue your interest, hobbies and sporting activities.
    • Keeping the Brain Active; Access to the Internet, opportunities for further study, or part time work, libraries.
    • Let’s Go Shopping; Proximity to a reasonably large shopping centre will have impact on your cost of living. Can you use “Loyalty “programmes like FlyBuys and discount cards.
    • Can You Afford to Move; Consider real estate, tax and social security implications, any cost of living changes.
    • Social Compatibility; Moving away from close friends and family may be painful. They may not visit regularly even if they promise they will. Are you good at making new friends and does the place you are moving to welcome new residents.

    Part 2: The Best Places in Australia to Retire.

     
  • midlifelove 1:29 am on February 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: best places to retire, Country Brand ratings, Forbes magazine, medical care costs, retirement   

    Best Places To Retire 


    Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

    — Mark Twain

    Author Twain’s advice applies at any age, but especially for those in their middle years looking ahead to possible “retirement”.  You maybe won’t ever want to “retire” like your parents did, but chances are you’ll be changing locations, changing your means of earning income, and maybe even changing countries.

    There are stacks of “Best Places to Retire Lists” around, all using different criteria. CBS’ Moneywatch has done a good analysis of some of the more popular list sites get their ratings.

    But now Forbes magazine has compiled its own list of the 10 best retirement havens for US citizens, based on a wide variety of criteria ranging from safety to retiree-friendly visa requirements to decent medical care.

    Forbes’ Top Ten Places to Retire

    Austria – A “lower-cost Switzerland” with mountains, the great outdoors, elegant architecture and trams that run. Vienna offers the highest quality of life on the globe, according to Mercer, and medical insurers say its private clinics are world-class.

    Thailand – Expect a warmly welcome, ideal for seniors on modest budgets. Considered Asia’s best buy for quality health care at reasonable costs, but the good private hospitals are in Bangkok, so make sure your beach retreat is within three hours of the capital.

    Italy – Warm Mediterranean sociability and one of the world’s best health care systems.  Great bargains in the South in Puglia or Sicily, or in cities like Sorrento on the Amalfi Coast.

    Panama – Year-round sun, low taxes, massive discounts for seniors, first-world amenities, quality private hospitals, bird-filled rainforests, a dollar economy and easy flights from the U.S.

    Ireland – Stunning countryside, cultural affinity, low taxes and many rebates for seniors. Overpriced Dublin reachable in a couple hours from anywhere in the country, so look for housing inland.

    Australia – The world’s best place to live, according to the Country Brand Index. The highest quality cities at the lowest cost, claims Mercer. The famously friendly Aussie has created a first-world country with low Asian costs.

    France – offers perhaps the friendliest of policies toward American retirees of any European Union nation. Considered most affordable quality health care in the world, plus low taxes for American ex-pats. Paris for wealthy, but Brittany, Normandy and the Dordogne, a short train ride away, are more affordable.

    Malaysia – Welcoming to retirees, low costs and spectacular coastline make it a strong contender for the budget-conscious, but also increasingly for the wealthy wanting an Asian tax haven. For health care reasons, avoid straying too far from Kuala Lumpur.

    Spain – The ‘Florida of Europe’ has long been a magnet for sun-starved Brits, so retirement infrastructure all in place. Coast overdeveloped but great value in lesser-known interior cities like Salamanca or Burgos.

    Canada – Cities from Vancouver to Montreal consistently score among the best in the world, both on quality-of-life and value-for-money benchmarks. Friendly policies toward retirees, affordable medical care and a natural cultural fit for Americans.

    Nowhere Is Perfect

    Says Forbes: “No place is perfect. Some countries rank high in one area but lower in others. Australia is by one well-regarded rating, the Country Brand Index, the most livable place in the world. But if you plan to return to the U.S. frequently, Australia makes for a long slog.

    “Canada is No. 2 in the Country Brand ratings and certainly convenient for Americans, but its harsh winters are well-known.

    “Italy scores high on quality of life, medical care, and cost of living and climate  . .  . But its complicated taxes and bureaucracy require patience.

    “So, the key to any decision: Know yourself and do your homework.”

     
  • midlifelove 11:55 pm on February 7, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: AARP magazine, , hot marriage, Jim Jerome, keeping up with young wife, male enhancement, ,   

    Michael Douglas: Keeping Marriage Hot 

    Michael Douglas answers the questions we’d all like to ask – like how does his 65-year-old body keep a smoking-hot marriage going with much younger wife Catherine Zeta-Jones – in a recent interview in AARP magazine.

    And not surprisingly, like many men his age, he relies on a little male enhancement.

    On Catherine: “God bless her that she likes older guys. And some wonderful enhancements have happened in the last few years—Viagra, Cialis—that can make us all feel younger.”

    Pick Up Line That Almost Blew It

    He talks frankly with interviewer Jim Jerome about how he almost blew his first meeting with Catherine, when he opened with a leaden pick-up line.

    “I want to father your children,” he said.

    “I’ve heard a lot about you,” she responded calmly. “It’s nice to know it’s all true. Good night.” And she was gone.

    Smitten, he persevered with roses and romance and the rest as they say is history. His second time round chance at marriage and children is something he never expected.

    Family Most Important

    “My career was the most important thing in my life, followed by marriage and children,” he confesses. “And it’s completely reversed now. I never anticipated starting a family and the joy of raising kids at my age.”

    Early on, the couple came to terms with the 25-year age gap between them: “Catherine is an old soul,” Douglas says.

    Still, there were complications. Douglas’s future in-laws-David, a retired confectioner, and Patricia, both now 62—were three years younger than the groom.

    “I wasn’t quite the son-in-law they’d envisioned. I do like to wind up Catherine’s father and call him Pops.”

    Hands-On Dad

    Just finished filming Wall Street 2, Douglas is playing “house husband” while Zeta-Jones comes home at midnight and sleeps in late with her starring role in the Broadway musical A Little Night Music.

    He is waking before 6:00 to help get the kids off to school. “I love to be the first face they see,” he says. “It’s a selfish pleasure. It’s a very special time, the mornings.”

    Zeta-Jones says that Douglas thrives on his at-home role: “Michael tells me that [new fatherhood] keeps him agile. He’s a terrific, extremely hands-on father.”

    Staying Fit at 60

    Douglas stays fit and energized by hiking, diving, and taking family skiing trips near his Quebec farm. But he admits that age has its limitations, in particular when he goes to the gym. “It used to be you got that 30-minute cardio workout and that great sense of euphoria. Now you finish and go, ‘Phew, I’m glad that’s over.’

    These days, the Douglases’ social life often amounts to hanging out with the kids or catching up with friends at a local restaurant. “You’ve got these few years of unequivocal love when Mom and Dad can do no wrong. So we’re a tight family unit.”

    Different from Dad Kirk

    It’s a different domestic scene from the one Douglas grew up in. His father, Kirk, according to Michael, didn’t handle parenting well. “I was the product of a divorced family,” he recalls. “My dad was always torn; he was working really hard and would want to see us. But then, with all his Kirk Douglas passion, he’d try to be a father for a week, a summer, whatever. It was tough.

    “I think it’s easier for me to be a good father. I’m not so concerned about my career,” Douglas continues. “I like to be home a lot more now.”

    Natural Enhancement

    If like Michael you’d benefit from a boost to your sex life, but prefer herbal to pharmaceutical products, there’s plenty to choose from.  For more information see  http://www.herbaligniteusa.com.

     
  • midlifelove 11:22 pm on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: More magazine, sexual conquests, Susan Toepfer, , Warren Beatty   

    Flaunting Flings Not Cool 

    It’s official: Having over 10,000 sexual conquests has gone from having an “oooh!” factor to having an “ewww!” factor.

    So says columnist Susan Toepfer at More.com about a new Warren Beatty biography which claims the actor slept with 13,000 women – still thousands short of NBA great Wilt Chamberlain who bragged in his autobiography A View From Above that he slept with 20,000 women.

    “Tedious” Tally

    But far from seeing it as something to boast about, 72-year-old father-of-four Beatty issued an immediate denial through his lawyer, describing the book as “tedious and boring.”

    Apparently, flaunting your flings is no longer cool, when you’ve been married to Annette Bening for 17 years and have three daughters, writes Toepfer.

    Devoted To Family

    Beatty’s reign as Hollywood’s most eligible bachelor came to an end when he clapped eyes on his elegant Bugsy co-star,  and he said ‘I do’ for the first time at 53, marrying Bening two months after the birth of their first child.

    “I was never divided on the subject with Annette,” the Independent quotes Beatty as saying. “I was never divided on the subject of having a child.

    “And I was never divided on the subject of her integrity or intelligence or capacity to love.

    “I think talent is energy and, let’s just say, she’s very talented! See, I think that there’s something in the unconscious that is the iceberg, and then there’s the tip of the iceberg, that’s the conscious. And when I met Annette, I thought, ‘Oh, I see’.”

    Rake Reformed

    Of course promiscuity is still alive and well – Tiger Woods is testimony to that. But Beatty, happily wed for nearly two decades and by all accounts devoted to his family, has changed.

    With a wealth of experience between the sheets to go on, he declared monogamous sex best. And in keeping with the discovery, the serial boyfriend showered affection on whoever was on his arm, rather than simply adding them to the countless notches on his bedpost.

    Said one of his lovers, Goldie Hawn: “Maybe he loved too many women in his early days but it wasn’t all about sexuality. It was about tenderness.

    “Warren by nature is a caretaker. Yes, he’s maddening. Yes, he’s stubborn. But the bottom line is the nature of that animal is good. His intentions are pure.”

    Perhaps that’s the difference between Beatty and Woods. While one never had any incriminating “sex tapes” or on-the –make porn stars peddling stories of time between the sheets, Tiger’s personal life has become a national joke despite his own monastic silence.

    No nasty stories. No tell-all revelations to tabloids, or calendars like the one in the NY Post of “Tiger’s Babes,” or embarrassingly “wise-after-the-event” cover story in Vanity Fair.

    Is it because being a roaming Lothario when you’re a single “hot” Bad Boy is one thing. Cheating on your wife and young children with a string of synthetic “hostesses” is seen as something entirely different?

    What do you think? Let us know.

     
  • midlifelove 10:17 am on January 3, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , no sex taboo, over 55s dating, relationships online, Stella magazine   

    Over 55s Dating Most 

    You can forget the idea of being “past it” in the dating game when you hit 50.

    More over-55s have found a partner on the internet, joined a matchmaking club or attended a special singles event than any other age group, research for UK-based Stella magazine has found.

    Stella commissioned YouGov, the research agency, to interview almost 2,000 men and women of all ages and backgrounds who have been on a date in the past year.

    The results contradict many popular views on dating, as well as some of the stereotypes of the differences between the two sexes.

    Over 55s More Sociable

    The survey found that almost two-thirds of men and women over 55 have joined a dating website (62 per cent), compared to just over one fifth (21 per cent) of 18-24-year-olds.

    They also met up with more internet dates (an average of 8.2) and found more relationships online (2.1) than any other age group.

    They even met more sexual partners online (an average of 2.4) than any other age group, with the exception of the 45-54-year-old age group (2.6).

    No More Sex Taboo

    Keren Smedley, who runs Experience Matters, a relationship and dating consultancy, said the results dispelled some taboos about the older age groups.

    “For most people the idea that our parents or grandparents have sex is taboo, but this is nonsense. The survey shows that people can still lead an active dating lifestyle well into their retirement.”

    The survey also found that 31 per cent of women bought a new outfit for their first date, 40 per cent varnished their nails, and 15 per cent got a bikini wax.

     
  • midlifelove 9:27 am on December 3, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: glass ceiling, , Mamma Mia, , older women in Hollywood, The Devil Wears Prada, women over 60   

    Meryl Streep – Box Office Queen at 60 


    Meryl Streep is breaking all stereotypes about Hollywood not being a place for older women, according to the cover story in Vanity Fair’s January issue.

    At 60, with three recent movie “hits” to her credit (Mamma Mia, The Devil Wears Prada, Julie and Julia) Streep is the industry’s “new box-office queen,” according to the profile by Leslie Bennetts.

    Producers hope for comparable results from It’s Complicated, a Christmas release featuring a love triangle between Streep, Alec Baldwin, and Steve Martin.

    Breaking Glass Ceilings

    “She broke the glass ceiling of an older woman being a big star—it has never, never happened before,” says producer Mike Nichols.

    The particular myths she has shattered include:

    There is no life after 40 for women in Hollywood.

    “It’s incredible—I’m 60, and I’m playing the romantic lead in romantic comedies!” says Streep in the interview.

    • Talent of Meryl Streep’s calibre should be reserved for dramatic roles.

    Nora Ephron, who directed Streep in Julie & Julia, says, “I would love to take credit for that amazing performance, but the truth is that she had read everything about Julia Child, she played the cooking tapes over and over between setups … and she even suggested that I cast Stanley Tucci as her husband.”

    There’s no money in making movies for women, particularly older ones.
    Mamma Mia grossed $601 million worldwide, despite some cringe-worthy reviews (for the movie, not its much-lauded heroine).

     
  • midlifelove 10:11 am on November 27, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Botox, , , Eric Finzi, facial muscles, Fake it till you make it, , Nat King Cole, neurological link, Smile   

    Women on Botox Happier 

    woman botoxNat King Cole knew more than we realised when he sang “Smile, what’s the use of crying, You’ll find that life is still worthwhile, If you just smile.”

    That’s because science is increasingly finding that changing expressions can influence mood, although scientists still don’t fully understand why.  But they are beginning to suspect a neurological link between facial muscles and brain activity.

    People asked to smile while watching a cartoon, for instance, report it is funnier than people who are not asked to smile.

    Botox Lifts Depression

    Now a series of studies seem to show that women who have Botox treatments are happier – and it has nothing to do with increased self confidence because they look better.

    First (in 2006) a Botox-happy cosmetic surgeon reported a  small study which claimed that filling out depressed women’s frown lines so they couldn’t wrinkle their brows helped lift their depression.

    The pilot study of 10 patients was the first to provide empirical support for what a number of clinicians say they have noticed anecdotally: People who get their furrowed brows eliminated with Botox (botulinum toxin A) often report an improvement in mood.

    Washington dermatologist Eric Finzi’s study found that even patients who were not seeking cosmetic improvement showed a dramatic decrease in depression symptoms.

    Not Just Self Confidence

    And a follow up study reported in Time magazine suggests that Botox may lighten people’s moods by literally wiping the frowns off their faces.

    The study, published in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, followed 25 cosmetic-surgery patients, 12 of whom received injections of Botulinum Toxin A or similar neurotoxins, the others receiving fillers, peels or other cosmetic treatments for wrinkles.

    Two weeks after the treatments patients filled out a questionnaire for depression and anxiety.

    “The Botox patients scored much lower on measures of depression, anxiety and irritability,” explains Michael Lewis, a psychology professor at the University of Cardiff and lead author of the study. “Crucially, there was no significant difference in how much their treatment made them feel attractive from those who had other treatments, suggesting that [the mood boost] wasn’t just down to a boost in self-confidence.”

    Face and Brain Link

    At the time, Finzi explained the results of his 2006 study using the facial-feedback hypothesis — a feedback loop in which people frown back at a depressed person, further deepening that person’s sense of isolation. He suggested that if a depressed person can’t frown because of Botox treatment, then others won’t frown back at them, thereby breaking the loop.

    Others have suggested facial muscles may alter the temperature of blood flowing in the brain. Relaxation techniques such as yoga and tai chi may help cool the brain and result in a more positive mood.

    Whatever the mechanism, moods can clearly be influenced by expressions, not just the other way around, said Paul Ekman, emeritus professor of psychology at the University of California at San Francisco, who has spent decades exploring the connection between emotions and expressions.

    “If you make a facial expression voluntarily, you can change the autonomic and central nervous system to generate that emotion,” he said.

    Meeting People Easier

    But Ekman said the relationship between emotions and expressions is probably too complex to explain Finzi’s finding. It is unlikely, he said, that simply altering one’s expressions can relieve depression.

    More plausible, Ekman said, is that changing expressions can help heighten or decrease emotional states. Or it is possible that by frowning less, patients in Finzi’s study seemed less forbidding to others, which helped to strengthen their social connections. In turn, that may have helped ease the depression, Ekman said.

    But Lewis says he favors the theory that facial muscles influence brain activity directly and points to earlier research that suggests such a neurological link.

    Fake It Till You Make It

    For example, studies have shown that subjects find comedy routines significantly funnier when they hold a pen between their teeth the way a dog holds a bone, a pose that stimulates the muscles used for smiling. Similarly, subjects laugh less when holding a pen between their lips, a pose that mimics frowning.

    Such studies are part of a growing trend in counseling and therapy that focuses on behavioral change — a new approach summed up by the Alcoholics Anonymous slogan “Fake it till you make it” — rather than the stern “talk therapy” of the Freudian era.

    Cognitive behavioral therapy, for instance, teaches patients to alter the physiological feedback cycles of certain conditions by slowing their breathing during panic attacks or cutting the hangdog look during periods of depression.

    But Lewis warns that his and Finzi’s studies both examined small sample groups, so it would be premature, he says, to consider Botox injections — at around $400 each — purely on the basis of their potential for mood enhancement.

     
  • midlifelove 10:49 am on November 20, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: die sooner, falls, , , muscle mass, , testosterone therapy,   

    Lower Testosterone Equals More Falls 

    herbal igniteIn sports, testosterone shots or creams are supposed to be magic bullets that spur athletes to train harder, run or bicycle more quickly, jump higher, swim faster, hit a baseball farther, recover sooner, and, let’s not forget, increased sex drive and combativeness.

    Testosterone injections can make male rats more aggressive in marking their territories, cause castrated red deer to grow antlers, and induce female rhesus monkeys to screech like males. In studies on humans, testosterone injections have increased and strengthened muscles.

    Now research has shown men 65 years and older with low testosterone have more falls than men of similar age with higher levels of the sex hormone.

    Researchers think this might be because low testosterone levels also lead to impaired vision, muddled thinking and poor coordination, according to a study by the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. The research found men with the lowest testosterone levels had a 40 per cent higher risk of falling.

    Die Sooner Too

    The study involved 2,587 men aged 65 to 99 starting in 2000 and continuing to March of 2005. Their testosterone levels were checked through a blood test, their grip strength, leg power and balance ability were recorded and every four months they reported whether they had fallen.

    Testosterone decline is a normal part of aging in men. The doctors noted that previous studies have shown that older men with reduced testosterone who got shots of testosterone experienced an increase in muscle mass and strength.

    Older men with low levels of the hormone testosterone may die sooner than other men their age with normal testosterone levels, another study suggests. But no “cause-and-effect” link has been established to justify testosterone supplementation, the professionals say.

    Regain Youth with Testosterone

    Researchers found that among 794 generally healthy older men, those with the lowest testosterone levels were 40 percent more likely to die within the 1985-2004 study period.

    “Like women on hormone replacement therapy, many older men are turning to testosterone therapy to regain some of what has been lost physically and mentally in the aging process,” said Dr. Eric Orwoll, a professor of medicine at the Oregon school.

    “These results validate the need for more research on this trend in treatment for men in the advanced years of life.”

    Testosterone in Herbal Products

    The herb tribulus terrestris has been shown in clinical trials in Europe to naturally build testosterone levels in men when taken as a dietary supplement. If you want to give testosterone levels a boost but don’t want to resort to injections, this in one option to consider.  Herbal Products like Herbal Ignite have been used with success by thousands of men to  increase testosterone levels and with them, enjoy the benefits including better sexual performance and higher energy levels. For more information see http://www.herbalignite.com.usa.

     
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