Where To Retire In Australia

You might sympathise with Hollywood star Bette Davis when she said “I will not retire while I’ve still got my legs and my make-up box.”

Many Baby Boomers see age as “just a number” and like Virgin boss Richard Branson (64) – who’s added training for the 2010 London Marathon to his punishing work schedule  – they’re busy packing more life into their years.

But even for those to whom “retirement” is a foreign concept, changing lifestyle, moving home, or splitting their year between two places, can be tempting as a mid-life option.

Looking For A Change

The children are independent, you don’t need to worry about climbing the corporate ladder any more, and you can take time out to think about what you want to do with the rest of your life.

If you‘re living in Australia or thinking of moving there, Jill and Owen Weeks have done a heap of research to help with your decisions.

Their book Where to Retire in Australia is a great resource for anyone in “the Moving Generation” looking for a change of lifestyle.

  • The Weeks’ golden rule is: the most successful moves are usually  less than 200km or no more than two hours from the old location. Why? So people remain in easy reach of old friends, family and social networks.

Key Issues To Consider

They’ve identified the key issues to decide on when making a change:

  • Taking care of yourself; Consider closeness to doctors, hospitals and specialist medicine if required; social life – how easy is for family and friends to visit, will you find  your others who share your interests, do you want to spend part of your year in another location?
  • Weather; Check out the climate before you buy. If you’ve only holidayed at the location at certain times of the year rent for 18 months before making a permanent move while you decide if the climate is for you.
  • Keeping the Body Moving; Ensure you can pursue your interest, hobbies and sporting activities.
  • Keeping the Brain Active; Access to the Internet, opportunities for further study, or part time work, libraries.
  • Let’s Go Shopping; Proximity to a reasonably large shopping centre will have impact on your cost of living. Can you use “Loyalty “programmes like FlyBuys and discount cards.
  • Can You Afford to Move; Consider real estate, tax and social security implications, any cost of living changes.
  • Social Compatibility; Moving away from close friends and family may be painful. They may not visit regularly even if they promise they will. Are you good at making new friends and does the place you are moving to welcome new residents.

Part 2: The Best Places in Australia to Retire.

Advertisements